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Social Care

OK Theresa and Jeremy and Tim and Nicola and Leanne and all the other pavement walking, door knocking, Manifesto-pledging Parliamentary candidates currently pounding our Nations’ streets, I have some questions for you. And, as a disabled person, I’m pretty sure there are many others from my community who have questions for you too. Why are you not speaking to us? Don’t we count? Don’t our votes matter to you? I hope not.

What I want to know, exactly, is what the political big-wigs and hard-hitters and movers and shakers in this country can offer to us? What promises can you give to all of us. What promises or pledges will you make to us? According to all the statistics I have been able to find, there are around 12-13 million disabled people in this country, what are you going to do to our lives any better for us? Are you totally disregarding the collective power and magnitude of disabled people’s votes and the votes of our families and friends? I hope not. Do you really think you can continue to either demonise us or watch others doing the demonising without us noticing? I hope not. Are you going to continue putting our needs to the back of the queue? I hope not. Are you going to go on ignoring us? I hope not.

Well, here are my questions at any rate.

We are told that Social care in this country is in crisis. That there is not enough money to pay home-carers and unpaid carers a decent wage or benefit that reflects what they do to support and enable us. What are you going to do about it? We are the net users of that care, what are you planning on doing to alleviate the situation and ensure that we get the care we want and need to allow us to live our lives to the full?

What are you going to do?

Many of us need to use aids and adaptations in our daily lives such as hoists and wheelchairs and hearing aids and aids for people with visual impairments. What are you going to do so that we can all get the best equipment we need to live without having to fight for every nut, bolt, screw, , plug, cable and electronic component?

What are you going to do?

Then there is the constant battle to find a home, a place to live which can cater for our access needs and accommodate us properly and in comfort. It’s often one of the greatest obstacles we face but one where we appear to get little or no help in getting what we need. What are you going to do to ensure that there are houses and flats and bungalows available which allow us to live in the community with our families, alongside our friends and neighbours without having to fight for funding for alterations and adaptations?

What are you going to do?

How are you proposing that your party will ensure that disabled children and young people can receive the education they need and deserve alongside their non-disabled compatriots? How are you going to try to ensure that they can all study together and not be segregated due to an impairment meaning the school or college is physically inaccessible for all?

What are you going to do?

Everyone falls sick at some point in their lifetime, what are you going to do to ensure that everyone can access the healthcare we all need and not find it being rationed according to how much we need it and how expensive it is? How are you going to give us access to the doctors and specialists and the nursing professionals we need in our hospitals? Are you going to ensure that these professionals receive salaries that reflect their skills and dedication? Are you going to make sure that they have working conditions such as hours and breaks that allow them to do their jobs to the best of their ability and not want to leave?

What are you going to do.

Then there the employment thing. We are told that everyone must work and get a job. What are you going to do to ensure that disabled people who can work get the support they need to do so safely and successfully and that those that can’t work due to their impairments are not demonised and punished for daring to be sick and disabled. Many of us would like to have the opportunity to do something, however small, what are you going to do to help us? How are you going to promote disability in the workplace so that those of us who can work and want to work get the support we need and the opportunity to do so?

What are you going to do?

Talk to us and tell us how you are going to help and support us. Why should we vote for you and your party as opposed to the other parties and their candidates? What are you going to do that will make a difference for us? Don’t write off 13 million potential voters. Please talk to us and tell us what you’re going to do to help us. If you want my vote give me a reason to put my cross next to your name on the ballot paper. What difference are you going to make to my life? Why should I vote for you, please tell me.

What are you going to do?

Oh goody!

Such fun!

The amazingly incompetent DWP strikes again!

Brief bit of background info – I am currently in the process of being transferred from the Disability Living Allowance I have been receiving since 1998 onto the new Personal Independence Payment. Around six weeks ago a kind and long-suffering friend helped me complete the frighteningly lengthy claim form, in excruciating detail, which I then returned, complete with copies of my Social Services and District Nurses Care Plans as evidence that I was not tell lies or over-egging the situation and my needs.

Well, yesterday I received a letter saying they were coming to see me to do a home visit and check that I really am as disabled as I said that I am and that I am really in need the help I say that I do.

Great!

No real problem with a personal visit and assessment except for the fact that it will be a colossal waste of both their, and my time.

First of all the appointment is for 9am-11am. Well, that’s not convenient. My carers come at 9.30am to wake me up, wash me down, attend to all my personal care needs, get me ready for the day and provide me with my breakfast. The assessor will just have to wait in the kitchen whilst I get my full body wash, have my catheter bag emptied and my incontinence pad changed. I’m not having them in my room to watch any of that.    

Secondly, my carers are here for around an hour for my morning visit, and can’t change their times as the have several other clients to see, so the assessor really will have to wait in the kitchen until they have finished everything they have to do.

Thirdly, in order to ensure that the assessors don’t, themselves, lie in their report ,about what they ask me and what I say to them (there are too many reports of this happening with other disabled people for me to take the risk), I will be recording the whole thing. The DWP allow this, if you inform them in advance that this is what will be happening, but it needs to be recorded on a double cassette or CD recorder so that I can keep one one copy and that they can take the other with them. No digital recording on a computer, tablet or laptop, no dictaphones, nothing modern, just an old fashioned cassette or cd recorder. Now, how many people still have one of those?

Not me.

Why am I going to have to go through this indignity yet again anyway? I fully understand the need to ensure that Welfare Benefits are going to the people that are actually entitled to them and need them. But really. Can’t the people at ATOS Healthcare read? I sent copies of my Care Plans for a reason – as proof that I am genuinely disabled. Are my Social Worker and my District Nurses really going to spend time detailing all the help I need if I didn’t actually need it? Is my Local Authority really going to be spending an inordinate amount for carers to come in to do everything for me on a daily basis or no reason? Somehow, I don’t think so.

The pen-pushing jobs-worths in the DWP need to learn to read and start employing some common sense, if, of course, they know what common-sense is. Disabled people, with genuine, documentary evidence of their impairments and the help they need just to exist, should not be hounded, day after day, to prove every little thing, in front of witnesses. It’s not right and it should not be happening. I am an emotionally strong woman but, even I am beginning to feel dispirited and depressed by the constant badgering. For other people all this disbelief and hounding and assessing and justifying themselves can be, and often is, the straw that broke the camel’s back.  

Employ some sense DWP, I beg you. If you ask us to send you medical evidence which proves our claims when we make them, do us the courtesy of actually reading the evidence we send you. You are looking for fraudulent claims so you can stop spending the taxpayer’s money on claims made by people who are not entitled to Welfare Benefits, so stop wasting our money going after people who really should and need to be getting that help and can prove it. What is this country coming to?

As I’ve said before, only this week, would you please just leave me alone. I, and so many other disabled people, have had enough. Learn to read and start checking the evidence you ask us to provide. Doctors and Consultants, social workers, District Nurses, Medical Professionals, don’t write these reports for their own amusement, they write them for a reason. Do them, and us, the courtesy of reading what these reports say and then start going after the reall fraudsters instead of us.

We’ve had enough.    

I think I’m supposed to be grateful.

I think all of us disabled, and older people are supposed to say ‘Thank you’ to the Chancellor, Philip Hammond, for his much flaunted, much hyped boost of £2bn for Social Care in yesterday’s Spring Budget.

Well then.

Here goes…

Thank you Mr Hammond, you are so beneficent and generous.

Sure, £2bn is an awful lot of money, and, with any luck it, at least some of should help ease the Care Crisis we currently have in this country, but it can only help if it actually filters down to the people it’s supposed to be helping. My major concern is that it will be shared out amongst all the Social Services Departments, nationwide, and will just vanish into their usual, annual Social Care black hole. We, the older and disabled people who are the ones who are supposed to reap the benefit will probably get to see little, if any, of it at all.

As someone who is in receipt of Social Care, there I three places I can think of straight off where that £2bn could make a real difference if it was spent properly.

First of all, I would like to see the money being put towards ending the farce of the fifteen minute care-call. How can anyone in their right mind think that fifteen minutes is long enough to provide any form of meaningful care for a disabled or older person? It’s barely long enough to make a sandwich or boil a kettle for a cup of tea, let alone help a frail person access the toilet, get them dressed or undressed, make sure they’re comfortable and safe, cook a light meal and help them eat it, if they need help, make a bed and do a little light housework.

Some of Mr Hammond’s £2bn definitely needs to go towards this.

Secondly, the paltry amount Home Care workers get paid needs to be addressed.

When I was in receipt of Agency Care, via my Local Authority, the workers were receiving little more than the minimum wage, indeed, in some instances it seemed as if they were even getting less than that. I now get my care through a scheme called ‘Direct Payments’ whereby my Local Authority pays the amount they would have spent on Agency Care directly to me and I get to employ and pay for my own carers. In theory, this is a great plan and, for many, it works well but it is impossible to offer a decent wage for the work that needs to be done and therefore, get the most suitable carers. The amount I get, for example, allows me to offer an hourly rate of just £9.40, before tax and NI, hardly a fortune, especially when you consider the level of personal care I am expecting those workers to undertake.  I would dearly like to be able to offer more but, as someone with no private income whatsoever to fall back on apart from my Welfare Benefits, I am stuck with just the funding my Social Services Department allows me every month for my long-suffering and excellent carers. Hardly enough at all.

Some of Mr Hammond’s £2bn needs to go towards this.

Then thirdly, there’s something which doesn’t affect me personally as yet. The amount that is available for both short, and long-term, residential Care Home accommodation. How can we expect older and disabled people to receive good quality, dedicated care when they need intesive care or can no longer live in their own home, if the amount Residential Homes are given for each resident’s care package is so small? We can’t

Some of Mr Hammond’s £2bn needs to go towards this.

What I really want to see most after yesterday’s display of Governmental generosity would be a completely new Care Strategy for our country. There needs to be meaningful consultation with the Care providers, the medical profession and carers themselves, both Home Care and Care Home agencies and workers and the Care Recipients, namely all the older and disabled people who need help to live in comfort and with dignity. We need to be assured that any extra or new funding is being spent wisely and well and is contributing towards the wellbeing of those who need it most.  

Some of Mr Hammond’s £2bn definitely needs to go towards this.

I’ve been pondering.

Dangerous, I know, but the Daily Politics Show and the lunchtime news has got me thinking. Again.

And, today’s muse has led to me wonder what will be my, and our nation’s, enduring memory of our current Conservative Government.

What will we remember in the years to come.

What will be their legacy.

Good, bad or indifferent, what have Mrs May and her compatriots done that will stay with me past the end of her tenure in Number 10? What have they done which will leave lasting impression?

And I have just realised what I think it is.

Crisis after crisis. A never-ending stream of crises. My life, the lives of my friends and family, the lives of so many people in this country, appear to be doing little more than lurching from one crisis to the next. And the Government and its policies are largely the cause of this.

I know that we are in the midst of seismic political change in this country, with last year’s Referendum and the imminent triggering of Article 50, and that will crtauinly be unforgetable, but I don’t think that’s what I am likely to remember the most. I think the thing I will remember is the never ending series of crises we appear to be having. Day after day, week after week, month after month.

We currently have a major crisis in the NHS, due to a lack of funding, and our hospitals are struggling to deliver the medical treatment we all need.

We currently have a crisis in Social Care, due to lack of funding, and our Local Authorities are struggling to ensure that our disabled and older people receive the care in their own homes they need to live the independent and stress free life we all deserve.

We currently have a crisis in our education system, due to a lack of funding, thanks to a teacher supply shortage, unmanageable workloads and serious underfunding placing an insurmountable pressure on teaching staff in schools and colleges

We are now told we have a crisis within our Police Service, diue to a lack of funding, where forces nationwide are having difficulty recruiting and retaining detectives, which is harming response times and there has been an erosion in neighbourhood policing.

And what is it that all these crises have in common?

Funding, or rather, a lack of it.

Our health service is underfunded. Our Social Care Services are underfunded. Our Police Force is underfunded. Our Education System is underfunded. Underfunding seems to be the cause of crisis after crisis and this serious lack of money across the board will mean, in reality, that things can only get worse. Our services cannot continue to be run on a negative bank balance. Things need to change and they need to change fast. I’m not an economist, a financial whizz-kid or a politician but, even I can see that more money needs to be found, from somewhere, and it needs to be found soon if we are to avert a cataclysmic crash. And, finding that money, may be the greatest legacy this Government could leave both us and the generations to come.

There must be a way we can be led back from the brink of disaster and, as far as I am concerned, it’s up to Mrs May and her cohorts to do it if this plethora of problems is not going to overwhelm us and ruin our lives, and the state of our nation, for generations to come.

Finding the solution to all these crises would be the greatest legacy this Government could leave. We can only hope they find that solution soon, before it’s too late. .  

What an eventful political week.

Who could have predicted the momentous turn of events we have just witnessed only one, short month ago. Not me, for one. Saying goodbye to David Cameron and his team and hello to Theresa May and her’s is going to change so many things, long-term, for us all.

But, what do I as a disabled person, want to see delivered by the new regime?

Well, for a kick off I want to see an end to all Welfare Benefits sanctions, in particular sanctions which mean that disabled people are left without sufficient money to pay for food and medication and rent and energy costs and transport costs. I would like to see proper Welfare Benefits for disabled people where we didn’t have to continually justify our existence or prove how ill we are at every turn. Applying for Disability Benefits and attending never-ending face-to-face assessments or tribunals is soul-destroying, mentally traumatic and largely unnecessary. I want to see an end to people being punished for the crime of being too sick to work and being awarded benefit levels that allow us to actually live not just subsist. Just because we are either born or become too ill to earn our own livings does not mean we should always be put at the bottom of the heap or made to feel as if we are a burden on our families and society through no fault of our own.

I would like to see physically disabled people being able to access proper equipment based on what we want not what the government deem us as needing. The cheapest option is not always the best option in the long term. Giving us the bare minimum could be counterproductive. Spending a bit more to help us now may well mean less needs to be spent in the long term because our medical conditions might not deteriorate as fast, if at all because we are not having to struggle all the time for everything. There needs to be better provision of proper Mental health care and access to inpatient and outpatient treatment for as long as it needed, not a one size fits all system. Everyone is different and this needs to be recognised. There should also be mandatory mental health first aid training for anyone working with young or vulnerable people and for both physically and mentally disabled people, proper support for the NHS. I would like to see more funding made available for medical research which may lead to a better understanding of disabling conditions, better treatments and possible cures.

Another important consideration for many disabled people is care. I would like to see more money put into support for family carers, support for young carers. There should be mandatory respite care, for all disabled people of at least two weeks, annually allowing both disabled people and their carers a break where they can relax, safe in the knowledge that needs will be met. I would like to see this combined with increased level of social care. I would like to see family carers paid a living wage rather than just receiving the paucity which is Carer’s Allowance. I would like to see proper recognition of the value of family carers and how much money they save the nation. I would also like to see a proper rate of pay for all social carers. Without them and without family carers many more disabled people would need residential care or hospitalisation at a far greater cost to Social Services and NHS budgets.

And then there is transport and transportation costs. I would like to see a version of Taxicard available nationwide. I would like to see more investment in a fully accessible transport network. I would like to see much wider provision of wheelchair accessible transport such as Dial-a-Ride services and wheelchair accessible mini-cabs. Blue badges need to be universal for hospital carparks. There should be free parking or a refund of reasonable travel costs for relatives of people who are long-term in patients in hospitals.

These are only my initial thoughts and things that affect me personally the most but there are so many other things I feel that our new Prime Minister and her Cabinet should tackle that could benefit the lives of disabled and older people nationwide. Education, Transport, Access to Justice, Employment, the list is never ending.

Am I hopeful that we will see any of this?

Frankly, no.

I don’t want to sound rude, resentful and ungrateful but I am getting completely fed up with the loss of dignity, privacy, autonomy and spontaneity that goes along with being a disabled person, reliant on homecare and personal assistants for my every need. It’s horrible and I hate it so much. I would give so much to be able to have a lie-in because I feel like it, not think about what I’m going to have for my lunch until I’m actually hungry, do something without having to plan it days in advance and have a wash and get dressed without an audience, but I can’t. Just for once, I’d like to be able to be left alone and to chose to do things, because I want to do them, without anyone else being involved, but it’s not going to happen.

After a year of frustration, with agency staff looking after me, I now have a team of lovely carers, whom I employ myself, who come in three times a day, and they do everything for me. Which, don’t get me wrong, is nice, but, just for once, I’d like them, if to were possible, to just go away and leave me alone. They come into the house first thing in the morning, often when I am still asleep, and wake me up, even if I don’t want to be awake. They bustle around, opening and shutting doors, making idle small-talk and turning on the lights. They go to the bathroom, get a big bowl full of water and then strip the bedclothes and my pyjamas off me, wash me and give me a bed-bath. Whilst they do this, and whilst I am still half asleep, trying desperately to get back into the lovely dream I was having only minutes before they came, they ask me what I want for my breakfast and for my lunch and then one of them goes to fetch it. I’m hardly fit for anything before I’ve had my morning coffee but I have to go through the morning routine every day before I even get a glass of water. Forty-five minutes of frenzied activity every morning and then, just a quickly as it started,  I’m on my own until it all happens in reverse in the evening when they come to get me ready for bed. And this is my life. No frivolous conversation about what was on the TV last night, no questions about what I did the day before, no talk about what I’m going to be doing next month or next year, or my plans for the future, just the same thing, day in, day out. No variation. Well, I am completely fed up with being poked, prodded, turned, talked to, flustered and disturbed all the time. I would like to be able to wake up when I want to wake up because I feel like it, have a wash in a bathroom with the door closed, without an audience, change my mind about what I’m going to wear when I’m halfway through getting dressed because I don’t want to wear whatever I got out of the wardrobe after all. I want to be able to go to the kitchen and choose what I want to eat for my breakfast by looking in the cupboards to see what’s there rather than having to choose from the supermarket delivery note. I want to get to look out of the window and THEN decide if I’m going out or staying in rather than make all my plans for the day in advance. I want to be able to do what most people do and live a ‘normal’ life. I want to make simple, little decisions about my life, on my own, without comment, but I can’t. Don’t get me wrong, I really do appreciate the dedication of all the people who help me on a day-to-day basis but, just for once, I want it to be like the old days.

Having the autonomy to do my own thing was never something I truly appreciated when I had it but, now that I don’t, I really want it back. Being able to do something spontaneously was never something I really thought about but now I can’t be spontaneous I really miss it. In the past I have just gone to the station and caught a train to the other side of the country because I felt like it, now I can’t even change my mind about my sandwich filling without having to ask someone else to deal with it for me. Privacy when it came to being seen naked or in my underwear was never something that really bothered me. Changing rooms in clothing stores and leisure centres didn’t bother me and if someone wanted to look at me or stare then so be it. Once you have given birth, with an audience of doctors, nurses and midwives, you get to realise your body is not really your own. Even so, that was years ago and I thought it was something I could put behind me but no, it’s back and it’s not likely to go away now.

I so wish I could just be me again and have my old life back but, unless someone makes a medical breakthrough and finds a cure for me, I’m going to face the fact it’s not going to happen. I am just going to have to grit my teeth and get used to being the new me. It’s not the life I envisaged for myself when I was younger or the life I would have chosen but it is the life I’ve now got. Spontaneity, privacy and dignity as I knew them are now for other people, not for me. My life is now different and there are many other people who are involved in it so, I suppose, I had better knuckle down and get on with it.

Roll-on the future, let’s see what happens next.

Last week I had one of my regular long chats with my wonderful father and, as it often does, what he said got me thinking. Why don’t more older and disabled people know about all the things they are entitled to from the State and that they deserve to receive? How many lives could be improved and made easier if people just knew what’s out there to help them? Welfare benefits, home helps, aids and appliances, it’s all there and available but people often don’t know about it or don’t realise it applies to them and their own particular circumstances.

My father and my Step-Mother are a case in point. They are now in their 80s and their health is not as good as it once was. They both have trouble walking any distance due to disablin medical conditions and in doing all the things they used to delight in. They have had to slow down and do less than they used to. But, with the right help and support, they can still do what they want, when they want to do it. They can go on leading the happy, enjoyable, fulfilled lives they always have done and, more importantly, be able to continue to do so for many years to come.  

A couple of years ago I realised that neither of them knew about one of the main Welfare Benefits they were entitled to and, in my opinion, should have been receiving for several years, namely Attendance Allowance. No-one had ever told them about it, let alone mentioned it, even in passing. Attendance Allowance is a payment made to older people who need a little bit of extra help due to the restrictions placed on them, not only because of their age but also if they have any disabling medical conditions as well. They can, of course, use the money how they want but most people use it to pay for some kind of home care or for aids and adaptations within their homes to make life easier. It’s not a huge amount but it’s regular and it can help. I told my father and Step-mother about this benefit, they both applied and were awarded it. And what a difference it has made for them. My father has been able to buy himself a motorised scooter which has given him the freedom and independence to go out and do what he wants in the small seaside town where he lives. My Step-mother has been able to pay for a cleaner to come in once a fortnight to deal with the more awkward elements of housework that needed doing and that she was no longer able to tackle as easily as she once was. As far as I am concerned, this is exactly what the benefit is for, to give two older people who have worked hard all their lives the freedom and ability to remain in their own home rather than having to consider selling the house they love and have lived in for so many years and moving into sheltered accommodation or a care home.

But why did it take me to tell them about it? If it wasn’t for the fact that I have worked for charities for older and disabled people, giving advice and information on benefits, for many years they might never have found out what they could get. Why didn’t someone else such as their GP or their medical specialists give them the information. People find out about the help they may be able to get despite the system and not because of it.

Today I have seen reports about £12bn in unclaimed benefits. I wonder why. Could it be because people don’t know or understand what they are entitled to? There must be a way of ensuring that more people find out what there is out there for them and giving them the help they may need with applying for those things. Maybe, instead of having work coaches and employment advisers in doctor’s surgeries it would be better and more efficient to have benefits advisers there instead. Professionals who could help patients understand what they could get and, more importantly in my view, assist with the complicated application process. After all, if people were in receipt of the all the help they are entitled to then they may not need to visit their doctor so often and could stay out of hospitals and needing expensive and invasive social care help for longer. It might cost a little more to do this but there would be savings down the line in other areas as a result. Consider the picture as a whole and not the individual elements in isolation. Give people an easy understanding of what they are entitled to, help them apply and get rid of the hurdles stopping people from getting it. It makes sense in the long term.