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Hollywood

Well, that’s interesting.

I’m currently having a fascinating conversation on Twitter with some fellow Whovians discussing the big reveal today for the 13th regeneration of Dr Who.

We’ve got the usual posts and suggestions for a female Doctor or a Black Doctor but I suggested the possibility of a Disabled Doctor.

And I got this instant response ‘Get what you’re saying, but why would the Doctor’s regeneration leave him with a disability? Unless it went wrong, future story perhaps?’.

My hackles were raised – doesn’t this reply indicate the issue in a nutshell – ‘unless it went wrong’.

This implies disability is bad.

How about equality?

If a Black Dr or a Female Dr or an LGBT Dr is not a stretch, why would having a Disabled Dr mean that something went ‘wrong’? Where’s the big issue here? What’s the difference?

A friend has pointed out that the Doctor goes to places throughout the universe and, in that case, for some races/groups of Aliens, couldn’t being regenerated as a human be seen as something going ‘wrong’? If those aliens saw having six legs, two heads or wings and a tail as ‘normal’ then, being regenerated in human  form as completely wrong. If the Doctor regenerated as a Dalek, Cyberman or Sontaran then, for humans, that would be ‘wrong’ but for another Dalek, Cyberman or Sontaran it would be right and nothing to comment upon. Being human, in that instance, would be the abnormality.

I think this is actually yet another example of many people’s inability to deal with the concept of disability as just an alternative form of ‘normal’ . People don’t like to think of disability as anything else apart from being ‘wrong’ when it’s actually their attitude that’s wrong. If I’m out and about with a group of other wheelchair users, we’re our own normal and any upright or walking companions are the ones who are different. A group of hearing impaired people chatting away using BSL are no different from a group of French or German people speaking their own native tongues to one another, they just can’t hear the words or voices, rather, they just see them instead. Visually impaired people reading books with their fingers, in Braille, are not doing it wrong, they are just doing it as an alternative form of right, just as people who are not visually impaired reading print or handwriting is right.  We’re still seeing non-disabled actors ‘cripping up’ for roles in films as disabled characters. We have heard, only this week, of people being unsure about talking to disabled people in case they offend us. We’re seeing paralympic athletes being seen as ‘superhuman’, ‘brave’ and ‘inspirational’. Why? Disabled people are, after all, just people, we’re just people who are different in some way to what is perceived by the majority to be ‘normal’. There is nothing ‘wrong’ with any of us, we’re all just different and it’s time to start seeing ‘different’ as ‘normal’. We need to start seeing people just as people, regardless of their gender, sexuality, colour or disability. Sure, the Doctor recently had a storyline where he was blind for a couple of episodes, but he got ‘better’. Baby steps in the right direction but we’re nowhere near ‘there’ yet.

So, do I think we’ll get a disabled Dr for number 13? Almost certainly not. I still don’t think  people are ready for it. Dr 13 my well be Black, they my well be female but I think we’re still going to be waiting for a disabled Doctor until regeneration 14, 15 or 16. It will happen, I’m convinced that it it will, eventually, happen but probably not today.

But I’ll still be watching, I couldn’t not…

Ok, Hollywood centred rant coming up….

There is a new film around that has really rattled my cage and made me angry.

‘Me Before You’.

This block-buster film is due out next month, release date in the UK 3rd June.

I have two major problems with it.

Firstly, the disabled male lead character is being played by a non-disabled actor. Just why? AREN’T THERE ANY DISABLED ACTORS IN THE WORLD? Why a non-disabled actor? It’s not right. Secondly, and in my opinion, more importantly, it seems to promote the idea that disabled people are better off dead. Just NO. As a severely disabled woman I don’t believe this is true. Being disabled is NOT a death sentence, it’s perfectly possible, to live a good and productive life and be disabled at the same time.

So. Let’s start by looking at the issue of non-disabled actors playing roles depicting disabled characters on screen, TV or on stage. What is the issue with casting one of the amazing disabled performers there are in these roles? Are film directors and TV producers trying to say there aren’t any or that they aren’t good enough? If that’s the case, they’re wrong. There are plenty of amazingly talented disabled performers just waiting for the chance to shine. Or could it be that these same directors and producers believe that using real disabled people might make the viewing public uncomfortable? If that’s the case, why should it? Disabled people are part of every-day society in real-life, why not in the fictitious worlds we all pay to join when we watch a film? We are seeing more and more racially appropriate actors playing diverse ethnic characters, why not let us have a fully representative cast when making something that includes a disabled person in the plot, especially when that character is one of the leads.

Then there is the subject matter of the film. Implying that disability is a tragedy and that disabled people should consider killing themselves rather than continuing to be a burden on their families and on society is so wrong. Disabled people have as much right to live their lives to the full as everyone else. Where do we draw the line? How are we supposed to decide who has a right to life and who doesn’t. Are we saying that some disabilities are worse than others? Ranking impairment by effect on the individual disabled person or on society as a whole. Who gets to make that decision. Who gets to play judge and jury? Does anyone have that right? If we legalise euthanasia, in my opinion, we’ll be starting down a slippery slope. Some disabled people may feel they have no option but to take their own lives because of the ‘burden’ they consider themselves to be on their families or even those who are actually pressurised into it by their families. Others may feel they just can’t go on. Many disabled people experience considerable pain and discomfort due to their impairments and that is the reason they cite for feeling they would be better off dead. Rather than looking at ways to put an end to that suffering through death, why can’t we put more money, time and effort into improving the provision of palliative care. Decent pain relief and more effective treatments should be the way to go, not endless discussions on our right to life at all.  

Then there is the issue of how disability affects both the individual themselves and the people in the wider community are impacted by having disabled people in their lives. If I hadn’t developed MS at 24 there are so many people I would never have met, so many friends I would never have made, so many things I would never have done, I would never have started writing – my writing has happened exclusively because I am disabled. I would never have done my Post Grad-Law qualification, I would have stopped after my first degree and stayed in public libraries for my entire career. I would never have worked for the organisations and employers that have employed me. I would have missed so much. Contrary to popular opinion, disability has not ruined my life, it has made it. Without my MS I would be a very different person doing very different things. 

‘Me Before You’ is one film I wish had never been made at all and I, for one, will not be rushing to the cinema to see it. In my opinion the actors are not right and the subject matter is controversial and wrong. Disability is not entertainment. It’s real life and should be treated as such.