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OK Theresa and Jeremy and Tim and Nicola and Leanne and all the other pavement walking, door knocking, Manifesto-pledging Parliamentary candidates currently pounding our Nations’ streets, I have some questions for you. And, as a disabled person, I’m pretty sure there are many others from my community who have questions for you too. Why are you not speaking to us? Don’t we count? Don’t our votes matter to you? I hope not.

What I want to know, exactly, is what the political big-wigs and hard-hitters and movers and shakers in this country can offer to us? What promises can you give to all of us. What promises or pledges will you make to us? According to all the statistics I have been able to find, there are around 12-13 million disabled people in this country, what are you going to do to our lives any better for us? Are you totally disregarding the collective power and magnitude of disabled people’s votes and the votes of our families and friends? I hope not. Do you really think you can continue to either demonise us or watch others doing the demonising without us noticing? I hope not. Are you going to continue putting our needs to the back of the queue? I hope not. Are you going to go on ignoring us? I hope not.

Well, here are my questions at any rate.

We are told that Social care in this country is in crisis. That there is not enough money to pay home-carers and unpaid carers a decent wage or benefit that reflects what they do to support and enable us. What are you going to do about it? We are the net users of that care, what are you planning on doing to alleviate the situation and ensure that we get the care we want and need to allow us to live our lives to the full?

What are you going to do?

Many of us need to use aids and adaptations in our daily lives such as hoists and wheelchairs and hearing aids and aids for people with visual impairments. What are you going to do so that we can all get the best equipment we need to live without having to fight for every nut, bolt, screw, , plug, cable and electronic component?

What are you going to do?

Then there is the constant battle to find a home, a place to live which can cater for our access needs and accommodate us properly and in comfort. It’s often one of the greatest obstacles we face but one where we appear to get little or no help in getting what we need. What are you going to do to ensure that there are houses and flats and bungalows available which allow us to live in the community with our families, alongside our friends and neighbours without having to fight for funding for alterations and adaptations?

What are you going to do?

How are you proposing that your party will ensure that disabled children and young people can receive the education they need and deserve alongside their non-disabled compatriots? How are you going to try to ensure that they can all study together and not be segregated due to an impairment meaning the school or college is physically inaccessible for all?

What are you going to do?

Everyone falls sick at some point in their lifetime, what are you going to do to ensure that everyone can access the healthcare we all need and not find it being rationed according to how much we need it and how expensive it is? How are you going to give us access to the doctors and specialists and the nursing professionals we need in our hospitals? Are you going to ensure that these professionals receive salaries that reflect their skills and dedication? Are you going to make sure that they have working conditions such as hours and breaks that allow them to do their jobs to the best of their ability and not want to leave?

What are you going to do.

Then there the employment thing. We are told that everyone must work and get a job. What are you going to do to ensure that disabled people who can work get the support they need to do so safely and successfully and that those that can’t work due to their impairments are not demonised and punished for daring to be sick and disabled. Many of us would like to have the opportunity to do something, however small, what are you going to do to help us? How are you going to promote disability in the workplace so that those of us who can work and want to work get the support we need and the opportunity to do so?

What are you going to do?

Talk to us and tell us how you are going to help and support us. Why should we vote for you and your party as opposed to the other parties and their candidates? What are you going to do that will make a difference for us? Don’t write off 13 million potential voters. Please talk to us and tell us what you’re going to do to help us. If you want my vote give me a reason to put my cross next to your name on the ballot paper. What difference are you going to make to my life? Why should I vote for you, please tell me.

What are you going to do?

What is it about being a disabled person which means that everyone seems to think they have a right to know every grisly detail about your life? What is it about having a wheelchair that make you suddenly become public property?

I have not always been a disabled person, I used to be, what is laughingly called, ‘normal’. That’s how I grew up, but, when I was in my mid twenties, everything changed. I became ill and was diagnosed with an incurable and degenerating condition. Not my fault, not what I wanted, not what I was expecting, not my life plan, but it happened and there was nothing much I could do about it except to deal with it and carry on. Life is, after all, for living, whatever hand you have been dealt and however hard it seems to be. Plans change, situations change, everything can change. Nothing ever happens the way you expect so you just have to adapt and do the best you can with what you have. After all, you only get one go at life, what you have is not a rehersal, so, in my opinion, you have no option but to make the most of it and have fun, whatever happens.

But how much fun can you have when the world’s never-ending contingent of poke-noses come along? Sure, when you are diagnosed with a lifelong condition you can expect to be prodded, probed, questioned and cross examined by the medical profession, that is, after all, part of their job but then there is everyone else. All the other people that want to know everything.

There’s the people who decide if you are going to get all the equipment you need, such a wheelchair or a hoist. What do you need them for? How often are you going to need them? When do you expect to be cured? How heavy are you? We just need to weigh you. And, how tall are you? Are you sure? You look taller. We just need to measure you. And what’s your waist measurement? How wide is your bottom? Do you know how long your thighs are from knee to hip? I’ll just get my tape measure. Non-stop but seemingly justifiable questions. They’re fine – annoying but fine. 

Then there are the people who decide if you are going to receive any financial help from the State. They send you forms which include page after page of questions which need a written response and documentary proof if you have it. How does your impairment affect you on a daily basis? Are you able to get washed and dressed on your own? Can you brush your hair? How about your teeth, do you deal with brushing them yourself? Can you manage your own medication? Do you cook your own meals or does someone else have to come in to help you? Can you eat without help? How about using the toilet or having shower, can you manage to do that? Again, legitimate questions, but it’s still not nice. When you are disabled you really should focus on the things you can still do, not the things you can’t. If you focus on those things, the way all the legitimate questions make you do, then it is just so depressing and soul-destroying. You start to wonder what the point of carrying on is and whether you are just a burden. Not healthy.

But, at least there’s a point, of sorts, for all of those questions, money equipment, treatment, all bearable and understandable. No, the questions I’m talking about, the questions you really don’t need are the questions you get from random passers by. The taxi-drivers who ask “So, what’s wrong with you?”, the busy-bodies who seem to think it’s their right to know. Well, it isn’t.

When you’re waiting at the bus-stop in your wheelchair, you don’t expect to be asked by a small child how you use a toilet. You don’t expect to be quizzed by a teenager about whether you can still have inter-course. You don’t need to be challenged by a pensioner about your finances and told you are a scrounger. And you really don’t need to be interrogated by someone you’ve never met before on why you haven’t killed yourself yet. What are you supposed to say to that one? I’m a bit busy to do it today? Not this week thanks? Maybe next month? 

What is it that makes people think it’s they have the right to ask me personal, intrusive questions if they are not a specialist or a professional? Well, in my opinion, it isn’t. Not everyone has the right to ask me anything. Sure, the medics do and the Welfare Benefits assessor does and the Social Care Provider does and the disability equipment specialists do but that’s it. No-one else need to know anything at all about me at all unless I choose to tell them. I have just the same right to privacy as a non-disabled person. What is it about being disabled that makes me public property? If you’re not in the need-to-know category I would urge you to consider once again what right you have to know intimate things about my impairment, my business, my private life. Before you ask me that burning question, ask yourself if you would like to be asked the same thing and if you really have a right to ask me. Once you’ve done that, if your answer is that you wouldn’t and you don’t, then stop, swallow it and walk away. It’s none of your business and I probably won’t like it either.

Sticky-beaks and poke-noses would you just butt out and leave me alone, I’ve had enough.

Same Difference

Scope, the charity for disabled people, tweeted an interesting number when the general election was announced. There are, it said, 13 million disabled people in Britain. Some 89 per cent have said they will vote. 

The reason that number is worth paying attention to is that if the 89 per cent are true to their word, and if they use their franchise to hold the Government to account for its brutal treatment of disabled people, it might just spell trouble for Theresa May’s dreams of a three-figure majority. 

Now, let me make one thing clear at the outset. I’m not about to say who you should vote for. Journalists too often do that. I would simply invite you to consider the Government’s record when it comes to disability.

If I were to take on the role of prosecuting ministers over that, I would struggle to find somewhere to start. So long would…

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