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Monthly Archives: August 2016

Yesterday, there was an article in one of the more respected daily newspapers which stated that a survey in America had identified six medical conditions which had been rated, by hospitalised patients, as worse than death.

Really?

Worse than death?

Had any of the respondents to the survey actually experienced any of these conditions long term so they could make an informed decision or were they just guessing? Almost certainly not. I think that most people were, in fact, guessing.

I took a look at the list and, of the six conditions listed, I have experienced four of them and have lived with two on a daily basis for several years. Let me tell you guys, I reckon death would be far worse. Sure, these conditions are all things that can make life harder, a lot harder, but death would definitely be worse.

Death is not something you can learn to live with.

Death is not something you can get better from.

With death, you don’t get another try.

Death is the very end.

Finito.

I think the major problem we have here is fear. Fear of the unknown. For a start, all the people who took part in the survey were hospital in-patients. They were all people who were probably scared and worried and ill. According to the article, they were people with long-term conditions such as malignant cancer and heart failure. These were people who were scared and frightened by what was already happening to them, then they were given a list of other conditions and asked if a diagnosis with any of these would tip them over the edge. These people were sick and at a cross-roads, they were presented with a list of nasties and asked if they had a choice between them and death which would they chose.

Well, that’s not fair.

In those circumstances it is hardly surprising that death won. These people would have heard of all of these conditions, and may even know others who have experienced them, but they would have already been scared so asking a question like this, at that time, was wrong. Sure, the conditions listed are horrible and, for someone with no prior experience of a long-term, life changing medical condition, scarey, but, if these conditions are well managed and people receive proper treatment and care, there is not nearly as much to be scared of as you might think. Having to deal with any of the conditions listed can be difficult and, in some instances, unpleasant but, in my opinion, death would be worse. Furthermore, as this survey was conducted in the USA where people don’t have access to free, NHS care and participants would have to pay for treatment and care, this could have coloured their responses. Taking that into account however, of the six listed there is only one, ‘being confused all the time’ which actually would scare me. Even then, I’m still not sure if I would chose death as the way out. The others are, as far as I am concerned, all copable with. In fact, I have friends and acquaintances who do cope with them on a daily basis and they all have rounded and fulfilling lives. They are not sitting back longing for the Grim Reaper to call, they are out having fun and enjoying themselves.

I think this article is another attempt at promoting the thorny issue of Assisted Suicide. Running a story about what happens in another country is not right unless it emphasises the fact that it is another country and that things are different there. I’m not saying that people don’t have a right to choose, they do, but they need to know death is not the only choice available and what the situation is here. Sure, people should be able to go for the death option if that’s what they really want but they need to be given full, accurate information about other options available to them so they can make an informed choice and that doesn’t always happen and it should.

I hope that the newspaper in question runs another story about Britain in what happens here but I’m not expecting miracles. Balanced reporting would be nice for once but it probably won’t happen.